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Volume 8, Issue 2

When Moms Say Bad Words: Family and Peer Influence on the Frequency of Swearing

By: Emily Simpson, Joshua Duarte, and Brianna Bishop | Mentor: Dr. Chrysalis Wright

When Moms Say Bad Words: Family and Peer Influence on the Frequency of Swearing Swearing is taboo in modern culture. Even though this habit is deemed negative, many people continue to swear frequently every day. The purpose of this study is to determine who exerts the most influence on one's swearing habits: one's family or one's peers? Seven hundred and sixty-three university students were asked via survey who (mother, father, siblings, friends, or peers) swore most frequently during their upbringing. Read more

Small Mammal Response to the Gunnison's Prairie Dog Reintroduction

By: Melissa Ariella Paduani | Mentor: Ms. Stephanie Baker, University of New Mexico

Small Mammal Response to the Gunnison's Prairie Dog Reintroduction The Gunnison's Prairie Dog (GPD, Cynomys gunnisoni) is an herbivorous, burrowing rodent that was extirpated from the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in the 1930's by ranchers to make land available for grazing livestock. Currently, the GPD is the subject of a long-term reintroduction experiment overseen by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The burrowing and feeding habits of the GPD influences an ecosystem's biotic and abiotic factors significantly, making this species a keystone ecosystem engineer that plays a vital role creating heterogeneous mosaics of habitat. Read more

Parks as Places of Public Solace: The Perception of Parks after 9/11

By: Ryan Hammond | Mentor: Dr. Peter Jacques

Parks as Places of Public Solace: The Perception of Parks after 9/11 This paper investigates the utilization and public perception of parks in New York City following the 9/11 attacks, using a quantitative content analysis of local newspapers published within a year of the attack, specifically looking for themes indicating how parks were perceived and used. My preliminary findings indicate that parks were frequently used for large gatherings and memorials, that people found solace in the parks themselves, and that communities either formed or strengthened through use of parks following the attacks. Read more

Mathematical Modeling in Law and Political Science: Learning from Public Health

By: William Butler | Mentor: Dr. Zhisheng Shuai

Mathematical Modeling in Law and Political Science: Learning from Public Health This paper provides an overview of mathematical modeling in public health policy and recommends the teaching of mathematical models in other fields, like law and undergraduate political science studies. First, I describe various facets of public health in terms of their scope and goals. The complex nature of public health lends way to a description of mathematical modeling and the role it can serve. Various mathematical solution concepts are also provided, including the SIR model, reproductive number, and game theory. Read more

Mexico in 1999: Taking back the UNAM

By: Jared Muha | Mentor: Dr. Ezekiel Walker

Mexico in 1999: Taking back the UNAM In 1999, the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) reversed course on its tradition of free education and installed a tuition requisite for attendance. In response, students launched a massive strike and eventually overturned the decision. This paper explores the possible role global institutions like the IMF may have played and argues that the strike was part of a broader movement against economic globalization and legacy of Mexican student activism. This paper places the student strike in its proper context and analyzes how students perceived their role in the strike. Read more

Perceived Locus of Control in the Children of Military and Civilian Families Affected By Deployment and Divorce

By: Rebekah Kanefsky | Mentor: Dr. Sandra Neer

Perceived Locus of Control in the Children of Military and Civilian Families Affected By Deployment and Divorce This study was designed to explore the differences between locus of control (LOC) in children from civilian and military families and to investigate whether military deployment is associated with an external locus of control. Existing literature has focused on the negative implications of external LOC for children's mental health and achievement. However, research regarding this construct related to children of military families has not been conducted. In the present study, LOC was measured by the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale for Children, designed for individuals from the 3rd to the 12th grade. Read more