University of Central Florida Undergraduate Research Journal - Influence of Family and Victim Demographic Factors <br/> on Treatment Completion for Children Exposed to <br/> Abuse and Family Violence of Women
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Results

A preliminary analysis was done to verify this dataset did not violate the assumptions of ANOVAs so the analysis could be performed. There are six assumptions of linear regressions: level of measurement, random sampling, independence of observations, normal distribution, homogeneity of variance, and missing data/outliers. Level measurement was taken into account via the use of continuous scale instead of discrete categories. The researchers attempted to use a random sample but it is difficult to do so due to the population being investigated. A correlation matrix tested for independence of observations. A histogram, normal Q-Q plot, and detrended Q-Q plot verified for normal distribution. Homogeneity of variance was tested through the use of Levene's test for equality, resulting in no significance. Box plots were utilized to search for outliers, with none found. No missing data were found. Results of the preliminary analyses presented no concerns in moving forward with the analyses of data.

The first ANOVA examined the differences between primary caregiver's relationship to victim (mother, father, adoptive parent, or other relative) and treatment attendance. The average number of children who canceled sessions with the biological mother as primary caregiver was 6.06 (M = 6.06, SD = 5.15), while the average number of children who canceled sessions with their biological father as primary caregiver was lower (M = 4.29, SD = 3.61) (See Table 1). A statistically significant difference was found for primary caregiver's relationship to the victim, F(1, 125) = 4.2, p = .04, with more sessions canceled with the biological mother as the primary caregiver. However, the effect size was small at .03 (Cohen, 1988). The second ANOVA examined the differences between victim's gender and treatment attendance, and indicated no differences (See Table 2). The third ANOVA examined the differences between primary caregiver's gender and treatment attendance and no differences were identified (See Table 1). The last ANOVA examined the differences among primary caregiver's income and treatment attendance. No differences were identified (See Table 1).

The first linear regression examined the relationship between victim's age and treatment attendance. Results indicated no significant relationships, F(3, 97) = 1.15, p = .34 (See Table 2). The second linear regression examined the relationship between caregiver's age and treatment attendance. We found no significant relationship, F(3, 89) = 1.6, p = .19 (See Table 2).

Discussion >>